Rani Crowe

Prof. Scalzo Publishes Book (And other March Good News)!

We’ve got a lot of good news this month, so we’re dividing it into faculty and student/alum accomplishments. Check out all the amazing things your friends and colleagues have done!

Faculty Good News

Prof. Emily Scalzo’s new book The Politics of Division was published on Mar. 27!

The Indiana Writing Project was awarded a $15,000 grant titled “2017-2018 SEED Invitational Leadership Institute to Invest in Developing New Teacher Leaders.” The money from this grant will be used to support summer programming for teachers.

The Indiana Writing Project was also thrilled to send two local teachers to Washington D.C. in March for the National Writing Project’s Spring Meeting. In their time in D.C., teachers Jeri Tarvin and Katrina Gibson met with legislators to increase awareness about the work of NWP/IWP. They shared student writing and examples of professional development happening at our site.

Prof. Carolyn MacKay was awarded an NSF/NEH Documenting Endangered Languages Fellowship for her project:  A Grammar of Pisaflores Tepehua, an endangered language of Mexico.  It is a one year fellowship.

Prof. Susanna Benko and her colleagues Emily Hodge and Serena Salloum have had their work featured in Ed Week on the blog, “Curriculum Matters.”  The blog post highlights major findings from their study that was published in AERA Open.

Prof. Mark Neely has poems out or forthcoming in spring issues of FIELD, Passages North, Birmingham Poetry Review, Southern Indiana Review, and Timber: a Journal of New Writing.

Prof. Mary Lou Vercellotti published “The Development of Complexity, Accuracy, and Fluency in Second Language Performance: A Longitudinal Study” in the most recent issue of Applied Linguistics (the flagship journal of her field). It is listed in the top 5 most read articles of the journal. (Also, she will be dancing later this month in the Big Brothers Big Sisters Dance for Kid’s Sake event, so come out and support her!)

Prof. Emily Rutter’s article “‘Straighten Up and Fly Right’: A Contrafactual Reading of Percival Everett’s Suder and Bernard Malamud’s The Natural” was published in the recent issue of Aethlon, the journal of the Sports Literature Association. Her monograph Invisible Ball of Dreams: Literary Representations of Baseball behind the Color Line is also now under contract with University Press of Mississippi.

Prof. Frank Felsenstein spoke at the annual day conference of the Harry Friedman Society at the Jewish Museum, New York, where the title of his talk was “From Shylock to Fagin: Jewish Caricatures in English Prints.” He also lectured on “What Middletown Read: Rediscovering Late Nineteenth-Century American Reading Habits” at Ball State University.

Prof. Cathy Day was just featured on the CitizenLit podcast, which is produced by Aubrie Cox, who got her MA with #bsuenglish in 2013.

Prof. Jennifer Grouling was awarded as a finalist for the Outstanding Graduate Faculty Mentor Award.

Prof. Megumi Hamada’s paper “L2 Word Recognition: Influence of L1 Orthography on Multi-syllabic Word Recognition,” was accepted to the Journal of Psycholinguistics Research.

Prof. Rani Deighe Crowe’s short film script Heather Has Four Moms is an Official Selection for the Austin Comedy Short Film Festival Spring 2017. She is also directing the short film Welfare Check by screenwriting faculty Kathryn Gardiner this April. The film will star Muncie native and Ball State alumna Cynda Williams and Golden Glove Champion William Lee. The cast includes additional members of the Muncie community, and the crew includes many Ball State TCOM students.

Students and Alumni Good News

Daniel Brount (2016 graduate) was just featured on the Dear English Major blog.

Student Amanda Byk is the new Content Manager at the Facing Project.

#bsuenglish grad Rachel Hartley-Smith published her essay “Dumb Blonde” in feminist journal So to Speak.

Rachael Heffner (2014 graduate) was recently featured in the Daily Mail. Currently she’s working at a marketing firm in Indianapolis, Dominion Dealer Solutions, as their Social Media and Reputation Specialist.

#bsuenglish grad Abby Higgs recently published the final installment of her series “My Life with Annie Lennox” on The Rumpus.

Brittany Means has been accepted in the Nonfiction program at the University of Iowa.

Elyse Lowery had three poems (“Blood and Diamonds,” “Crosshatch,” and “Five Cigars”) published in the 3288 Review this month.

#bsuenglish grad Robert Young had his piece “11 Useless Kitchen Appliances: Crock Pots” published in Midwestern Gothic.

Current #bsuenglish students Kathryn Hampshire and Nikole Darnell, as well as recent graduate Lauren Birkey, all received Academic Honors in Writing.

Hannah Partridge was offered a summer internship in acquisitions from Wiley Publishing.

15 English graduate students were recognized at a graduate student recognition ceremony. (Ceremony attendees pictured from left to right: Nuha Alsalem, Hayat Bedaiwi, Andrew Wurdeman, Matthias Raess, Mary Carter.)

Writing Project Grant (and more February Good News)

iwp_primary_logo_colorThe Indiana Writing Project directed by Professor Susanna Benko was recently awarded a $20,000 grant for the College Ready Writers Program, sponsored by the National Writing Project. This program focuses on teaching argument writing in middle and secondary classrooms. The grant money will be used to invest in 12-16 experienced middle and high school Writing Project teacher-leaders. These teachers will engage in extensive professional development studying argument writing through the summer of 2017 and the 2017-2018 school year. Congratulations!

On Thursday March 2, Prof. Cathy Day will be reading from her work at Franklin CollegeOn Saturday, March 25, she will be speaking on “Getting the Most out of Your Writing Life” at the Antioch Writers Workshop. In June, she’ll be traveling to the 2017 NonfictioNow conference in Iceland, speaking on a panel about “Obsession in Nonfiction.”

The English Department’s undergraduate ENL license recently received National Recognition.

Prof. Frank Felsenstein and Prof. Jim Connolly were guest speakers at Columbia University’s Book History Colloquium.

Prof. Michael Begnal published an essay on the Chinese Taoist poet Li Po in the new issue (#7) of the Free State Review. Prof. Begnal also presented at this year’s Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture since 1900, on February 23. His paper was titled “Modernist Mythologies and the Poets of Santa Fe in the 1920s.”

Prof. Mary Lou Vercellotti had four submissions,”Research Faculty Fellow,” “Taking Steps to Control Variables in a Quantitative Quasi-Experiment,” “Interdepartmental Faculty Collaboration,” and”Building Institutional Support for SoTL” accepted into a new book on the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL), It Works for Me with SoTL, edited by Hal Blythe, Charlie Sweet, and Russell Carpenter. The goal of the book is to give interested teachers information about the scholarship of teaching and learning (researching the practice of teaching.) The book will be released this fall.

Prof. G. Patterson was invited to be the keynote speaker for Miami University Hamilton’s Women’s History Month event. The talk is called, “Don’t Despair. Organize: Activist Feminisms and Intersectional Futures.” They will be giving the keynote on Monday, March 6. The event is open to the public.

Prof. Joyce Huff  will be inducted as an alumni member of Phi Beta Kappa by St. Mary’s College of Maryland in recognition of her scholarly achievements since graduating.

Prof. Rani Crowe‘s short film Beautiful Eyes was screened in Berlin at the Final Girls Film Festival, a women’s horror festival.

Prof. Molly Ferguson‘s article, “Clowning as Human Rights Activism in Recent Devised Irish Theatre” was accepted for publication in the 2017 “Resistance in Modern Ireland” issue of Studi Irlandesi: A Journal of Irish Studies.

Prof. Jennifer Grouling‘s and Ph.D student Elisabeth Buck’s article, “Colleagues, Classmates, and Friends: Graduate v. Undergraduate Tutor Identities and Professionalization” will be published in Praxis: A Writing Center Journal in their May 2017 edition.

Meet Professor Rani Crowe!

Assistant Professor Rani Crowe has been making and performing her own work for over twenty years, from stand-up comedy and solo performance art, to multimedia installations and filmmaking. This semester, she is teaching one section of ENG 310: Screenwriting and two sections of ENG 425: Film Studies.

How would you describe your perspective on teaching?

rani-croweThrough watching, reading, discussing, and practical application exercises, I guide students to learn skills and build muscles that build towards a culminating final project where they practically synthesize the skills they have learned. I like to create early non-precious exercises where exploration, risk, and failure are permitted and encouraged in order to learn the process. I try to guide students to be able to articulate their own artistic goals and standards, and help them successfully meet them in their final projects.

When are your office hours?

Monday and Wednesday, 11 AM- 12:30 PM

What are you currently reading, if anything?

Screenplays: I try to read a couple a week. I am always looking for new ways to write them for myself, and good examples I might use for others.

Craft Books: Creating Screenplays That Connect and Adventures in the Screen Trade.

Personal Interest Reading: Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson and Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi  Coates.

Escapist: I have been enjoying the Jack Reacher novels by Lee Child.

What is a text that you think everyone should read?

Oh, I tend to buy multiple copies of Viktor Frankl’s Man’s Search for Meaning, Rainer Maria Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet (I have a favorite translation), Yasunari Kawabata’s Palm of the Hand Stories, and a children’s book called The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds that I give away freely as gifts to young artists. I also like Anne Bogart’s A Director Prepares, Peter Brook’s The Empty Space, David Mamet’s Three Uses of the Knife, Anna Deavere Smith’s Letters to a Young Artist, and Matthew Goulish’s 39 Microlectures: In Proximity to Performance. I reference these books often. These are all books that feed me in creative process either with inspiration or example.

What is your biggest pet peeve in the classroom, or a big mistake that students tend to make?

I have two pet peeves:

One is when a student’s goal is merely to please me or get a grade. I want students to have their own critical thoughts, and I want them to have their own goals and agency for the class. They will get more out of it, and I can help them get farther.

Another is if a student starts to struggle (whether they get behind or miss classes due to stress or they have a legitimate crisis), and they compound their situation by not coming to class or not communicating because they feel ashamed or embarrassed or want to avoid the situation. The hole gets bigger. So often, there are resources within the university that can help them, or I can work with them to make accommodations if they communicate early. I want my students to be successful. I am rooting for them. I think most professors are. When the student gets down in that hole and lets it get bigger and bigger, it is harder for us to help them later.

Are you working on any projects at the moment?

I am working on fundraising and pre-production to direct a short film called Finding Grace, written by Screenwriting Faculty, Kathryn Gardiner. We hope to shoot in the spring.

I am working on fundraising and development for a short film I am writing, Heather Has Four Mommies, which was shortlisted for the Kevin Spacey Foundation Grant, but it wasn’t funded, so we are still raising money. We want to shoot in the early summer.

My recent short film, Texting: A Love Story, is winding up its festival circuit time. It still has some screenings left. It has been accepted to 74 festivals around the world, so far. Next, I hope to find an online home for it.

I have a few concepts for features and pilots that I am still developing. (Film is a long process with many phases. It is best to be working on several things at once.)

What are some of your hobbies or interests?

I make jewelry, mostly beaded earrings. I have a cat, a dog, and a rabbit. I love to travel when I can. I speak French. I love theater, performance art, art museums, and other performance or art events. I like to kayak and ride my bike. After managing a fancy restaurant, I like wine and food. I have been doing some work on my house. I read a lot, when I have time. I like many kinds of music.

What is a piece of advice you would offer students?

Love the process. If you are doing it to become a famous writer/filmmaker/actor/musician (whatever), your chances of failure and disappointment increase. If you love the process of making the work, you are more likely to be happy and accumulate work that is actually more likely to lead you to some type of success. It takes time and practice. Patience is something I am still learning, but the accumulation of work does eventually start to manifest results.

Is there anything else you’d like to add about your background, research areas, passions, goals, etc.?

I started as an actor, then I did stand-up comedy, then playwriting, then directing, then performance art, and then filmmaking. They all build off each other and inform each other. I think of myself as an artist first. Whatever content I am working with dictates what medium will best serve it.