Deborah Mix

Hayat Bedaiwi Discusses Great Grad School Opportunities

Hayat Bedaiwi received her BA and MA in English Literature from King Saud University in 2007 and 2012, respectively. She is currently a third year PhD #bsuenglish student who aspires to specialize in Ethnic American Literature with a major focus on Arab American Literature. Here’s more info about our graduate programs. 

hayat
When I first started my graduate studies at Ball State University, I took great courses that helped me become the scholar I am today. There are two experiences that come to my mind when I think of the courses that I have taken so far in graduate school. I turned papers I had written for two courses into conference papers. One paper was for a 657-postcolonial studies class, where I was blessed with the help and support of a great professor, Dr. Molly Ferguson. In that course, we read different postcolonial texts in the light of trauma theory. I was anxious when the course first started, but as we read and had different discussions every week, I knew what I wanted to write about for the seminar paper in that class. I wrote about Women at Point Zero by Nawal El Saadawi concerning the ideas of silence and bearing witness to the many traumas that filled the main character’s life.

(more…)

Advertisements

Jeff Owens: What I Learned from Writers’ Community

Since we’re approaching the end of Spring semester, it’s time to hear what the English public relations interns have to say! Today, Jeff tells us about his experiences in the Writers’ Community — from freshman year to junior year.

If you’re interested in attending Writers’ Community, it takes place during the Fall and Spring. Meetings are from 8:00 – 9:00 PM on Wednesdays in Robert Bell’s Writing Center (RB 291).


Looking back, I guess I’d describe the majority of my freshman year as “comfortable.” After acclimating to college life, I was meeting new people, spending more time outside my dorm than inside, and writing more often.

When my second semester rolled around, I felt confident enough to attend a Writers’ Community meeting. And why wouldn’t I? In high school, I was head tutor of the writing lab, I edited too many narrative essays to count, and people voted me “Most Likely to Write a Novel.”

Writers’ Community would be old hat, or at least that’s what I told myself. But I didn’t make a single contribution to the writing workshop that night. Making proper small talk proved impossible. I spent more time wiping the sweat from my hands than looking people in the eye. (more…)

4 Takes on the Human Body: Come to Take 4 on 4/3

April 3, 2015 (4:30 – 6:30 PM)

You can listen to Adam Beach, Debbie Mix, Joyce Huff, and Liz Whiteacre share their research and writing in Robert Bell 361!

Each presentation will be about the human body, and there are a lot of ways to do that. Some bodies are accepted as “beautiful,” while others aren’t. Some injuries can change a person’s life. Some industries see the body as a commodity.

Following their presentations, you’ll have time to ask questions, learn about other upcoming events, and mingle. The event is free and open to the public.

We hope to see lots of people there: undergraduates, graduate students, and all faculty!


A little bit about the speakers


Dr. Adam Beach Adam Beach


Deborah Mix Debbie Mix


Joyce Huff

Joyce Huff

  • She earned her Ph.D. in English at George Washington University, and she specializes in Victorian literature. Her research explores the representation of stigmatized human bodies.
  • Her poem, “The Hymn of a Fat Woman” was selected for the Library of Congress’ Poetry 180 Project.
  • She’ll be running Ball State’s academic journal next year: Digital Literature Review. The theme will be “Freak Shows and Human Zoos,” and you can e-mail (jlhuff@bsu.edu) her if you’re curious about joining the immersive learning project.

Liz Whiteacre Liz Whiteacre


We hope to see you there!

Dr. Deborah Mix Introduces Her VBC Seminar on Vernacular Memorials

This semester, I have the pleasure of being a fellow at the Virginia Ball Center for Creative Inquiry.  The idea behind the VBC is to create space for immersive, collaborative, interdisciplinary learning.  The reality of being at the VBC is, well, flat-out fantastic.  It’s the only teaching responsibility I have this semester, and it’s the only coursework my students have (they’re each earning 15 credit hours for the seminar).  We get to meet in a beautiful house; we get to travel to Washington, DC; and we get to work together in ways that regular classes just can’t allow.

(more…)